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(Nov. 1) From Supramolecular Chemistry towards Adaptive Chemistry Bioorganic and Biomedical Aspects

Last updated :2017-10-31

Topic: From Supramolecular Chemistry towards Adaptive Chemistry Bioorganic and Biomedical Aspects
Speaker: Professor Jean-Marie Lehn
(1987 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, University of Strasbourg in France, School of Chemistry at Sun Yat-sen University)
Host: Academician Xinzi Chen  (School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University)
Time: 10:00 am, Wednesday, November 1, 2017
Venue: 211 Lecture Hall, School of Electronics and Information Technology, Guangzhou East Campus, SYSU

Short Biography:
Jean-Marie Lehn is Professor at the University of Strasbourg Institute for Advanced Study (USIAS), Honorary Professor at the Collège de France in Paris and Emeritus Professor at the University of Strasbourg. In 1968, he achieved the synthesis of cage-like molecules (cryptands) containing a cavity (crypt) into which another entity, molecule or ion of specific nature, can be lodged, forming a cryptate. This work expanded into the investigation of the chemical basis of “molecular recognition” (the way in which a receptor molecule recognizes and selectively binds a substrate), which plays a fundamental role in biological processes. Over the years these studies led to the definition of a new field of chemistry, which he called “supramolecular chemistry”. It deals with the complex entities formed by the association of two or more chemical species held together by intermolecular forces.

In 1987, Jean Marie Lehn was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, together with Donald Cram and Charles J. Pedersen.

Professor Lehn's work developed into the chemistry of self-organization processes, based on the design of "programmed" chemical systems that undergo spontaneous assembly of suitable components into well-defined supramolecular species, directed by the supramolecular processing of molecular information. More recently, the implementation of dynamic features and of selection led to the development of “constitutional dynamic chemistry”, concerning entities able to undergo reorganization in response to external stimuli, thus pointing to the emergence of an “adaptive and evolutive chemistry”.