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Professor Wang Min from the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University achieves major breakthrough in cerebral vascular research

Last updated :2016-08-26

Source: The First Affiliated Hospital
Written by: The First Affiliated Hospital
Edited by: Wang Dongmei

Professor Wang Min from the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University led a collaborative research between the Vascular Biology Program at Yale University and the Center for Translational Medicine in The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University. The work "Endothelial exocytosis of angiopoietin-2 resulting from CCM3 deficiency contributes to cerebral cavernous malformation” was published in Nature Medicine (IF 30.357) on August 22 (http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nm.4169.html). The corresponding author is Professor Wang Min. Yale University and the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University are the joint corresponding author institutions.

Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations that result in seizure and stroke. Currently, the mechanism for CCMs pathogenesis is unknown. The existing treatments for CCM are surgical resection, medical therapy and interventional radiology, which lack precision therapy. This paper discovers loss-of-function in CCM3 (CCM arises from loss-of-function mutations in one of three genes CCM1, CCM2 or CCM3) will cause CCMs, and secretion of ANGPT2 in endothelial cells contributes to the progression of the CCM disease. Using an animal model of the disease, Wang Min and his co-authors demonstrates that blockade of a growth factor (angiopoietin-2) by an antibody eliminates the malformations. This paper reveals a novel mechanism in the progression of the CCM disease and provides a strong basis to develop precision medicine for CCM disease.

 
Diseased mice treated with mock (left) or angiopoietin-2-neutralizing antibody (right). The antibody blunts cerebral cavernous malformation progression. The mouse cerebellum sections use staining of CD31 (red) and claudin-5 co-staining (green), and cell nucleus use DAPI staining (blue).
 
Professor Wang Min, selected into the “Thousand Talents Program”, was recruited to the First Affiliated Hospital in Sun Yat-sen University in 2014. Professor Wang devoted himself to high level collaborative research between the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University and the Vascular Biology Program at Yale University, and developed a lot of young and middle-aged talents with international visions. Professor Ji Weidong (the Center for Translational Medicine in the First Affiliated Hospital at Sun Yat-sen University), Dr Wang Zong-ren (a Ph.D student of the Urinary Surgery in the First Affiliated Hospital at Sun Yat-sen University) and Dr. Zhou Huan-jiao (the Vascular Biology Program at Yale university) made great contributions to this work.